Lawmakers want banks punished over massive Ponzi scheme

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Lawmakers are asking a top federal regulator to crack down on several banks connected to a mid-2000s Ponzi scheme, arguing the government hasn’t done enough to get victims compensation.

The lawmakers called on the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) to punish several banks for holding funds for Allen Stanford, convicted in 2012 of running the second-largest Ponzi scheme in United States history.

In a letter to acting Comptroller Keith Noreika dated Aug. 8, Reps. Roger Williams (R-Texas), Bill Posey (R-Fla.), Charlie Crist (D-Fla.) and Vicente González (D-Texas) asked the OCC to update them on efforts to hold the banks accountable, compensate victims and prevent similar schemes from happening again.

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



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Grant Thornton Update to Creditors June 2016

In an effort to keep you informed, below are some of the actives the Joint Liquidators have been working on since the filing of our last report.

The Creditors Advisory Committee
The CAC has been re-formed and a meeting was held recently to discuss the current status of the liquidation and its future plans. Some of the salient initiatives are listed below.

TD Bank Litigation 
TD has filed its Amended Statement of Defense and the JLs are in the process of preparing and finalizing our Reply. Meanwhile, the estate is pushing for the commencement of production and discovery proceedings. We have also been working closely with US Class Counsel to advance and coordinate the bank claims.

Law Firm Claims 
We are continuing to prosecute the claims against the law firms in Antigua. It is expected that hearings on the jurisdictional issues will be heard towards the end of this year

HSBC Claims 
HSBC agreed to provide disclosure on an agreed list of requests. In our view this issue has not been fully complied with. It has also become clear that we need to examine individuals, a position to which HSBC has yet to agree. Our current tolling agreement extending the time for filing expires on 30 June. Thus, we are of the view that we need to invoke S236 for proper production and examination. We anticipate our request to be contested.

Based on the information we have to date, we suspect that there were deficiencies in procedures by the bank and that certain “red flags” existed. We are working closely with our advisors to develop the case……………………..

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



How a Canadian bank backed a billionaire fraudster

The Billionaire and the Bank
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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/

Allen Stanford’s house of cards: How TD banked the 2nd-largest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history

Allen Stanford’s con was epic. He was responsible for the second biggest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history outdone only by Bernie Madoff.

With a silver tongue and endless charisma, the brash Texan built a multi-billion dollar bank on the island of Antigua. By the late 2000s Stanford Financial Group had grown into an empire with over 21,000 clients throughout the U.S. and South America.

When it collapsed in 2009, over $7 billion in investments disappeared in what one U.S. judge would call “one of the most egregious criminal frauds ever presented to a trial jury in federal court.”

To pull off that massive scam, Stanford needed help and he found it in the most unlikely of places – the Toronto Dominion Bank in Canada………………….

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For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/



TD missed ‘warning signs’ about notorious fraudster, lawsuit alleges

Allen Stanford, the Texas-born ex-billionaire responsible for one of the world’s largest Ponzi schemes, is serving a 110-year sentence in a Florida prison. But outside those walls, other legal battles over his massive fraud are still being waged and involve one of Canada’s largest financial institutions: Toronto-Dominion Bank.

Mr. Stanford, now 65, was once known as Sir Allen, after he was knighted in his adopted home of Antigua and Barbuda, before his title was revoked. He was supposed to be running what appeared to be a staggeringly successful private offshore bank. But in fact, he and a small group at the top of his organization were looting his Stanford International Bank Ltd., using some new investors’ money to pay returns to previous ones and living large on much of the rest.

His empire came crashing down in 2009, when his bank was exposed as a massive fraud that cost his 21,000 investors at least $5.5-billion (U.S.). But until then, he enjoyed a lifestyle worthy of a Bond villain, acquiring his own small Caribbean island for $63-million, a fleet of private jets and helicopters, and a handful of luxurious mansions that included a 57-room “castle” in South Florida, complete with a moat…………………

Read the Entire Article here.

For a full and open debate on the Stanford receivership visit the Stanford International Victims Group – SIVG official Forum http://sivg.org.ag/